Word of the day: Chimera

It has been a while since I’ve written a WoTD post, but I’m going to try to keep at it from now on. The first I think I’ve  heard of the word ‘chimera’ was in a Harry Potter book, many of us know it as a mythical creature but I wasn’t aware of its second meaning.


  1. (in Greek mythology) a female monster with a lion’s head, a goat’s body and a snake’s tail.
  2. an unrealistic hope or dream.

Source: Compact Oxford Dictionary & Thesaurus

Page. 149

Cheers :)

Word of the day: Honkytonk

I was listening to some Alan Jackson when I heard him mention this word in one of his songs and heck, it sounded catchy so I was curious about what it meant and come on, I can’t go singing something I don’t know!

  1. a cheap, noisy, and garish nightclub or dance hall.
  2. adjective
  3.  of, pertaining to, or characteristic of a honky-tonk: a honky-tonk atmosphere.
  4. characterized by or having a large number of honky-tonks: the honky-tonk part of town.
  5. Music . noting a style of ragtime piano-playing characterized by a strict two-four or four-four bass, either contrapuntal or chordal, and a melody embellished with chords and syncopated rhythms, typically performed on a piano whose strings have been muffled and given a tinny sound.

Source: Dictionary.com

Word of the day … well sort of: 404

Though this isn’t a word, but it still has a meaning behind it, most of us get frustrated when we see it (1.) …

  • 404
1. noun

Also called 404 error . Computers . an error message sent by a Web server to a browser when the user has typed an incorrect URL, tried to access a Web page that is no longer available, or clicked on a broken link on a Web page: They must have taken down their Web site; I keep getting that annoying “404 – File Not Found” message.
Slang . a person who is stupid or uninformed.

Source: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/404+?qsrc=3086

Word of the day: Cicerone

Today’s word is:

  • Cicerone (pl.ciceroni)

– a guide who gives information about antiques and places of interest to sightseers.

<ORIGIN> early 18th cent.: from Italian, from Latin Cicero, Ciceron apparently alluding humorously to his eloquence or learning.

Source: The New Oxford American Dictionary

Word of the day: Lollapalooza

This one sounds like one of the words my five year old brother made up but what it actually means is: Lollapalooza noun, Slang 1.  an extraordinary or unusual thing, person, or event; an exceptional example or instance. Origin: 1900–05, Americanism ;  origin uncertain Source: Dictionary.com 2.   an annual music festival featuring popular alternative […]

Rate this:

Word of the day: Delate

The word of the day is: Delate – report (an offense or crime): they may delate my slackness to my patron. <DERIVATIVES> n. delation, n. delator <ORIGIN> late 15th cent. from Latin delat-, ‘referred, carried away’, from the verb  deferre. ,Source: The New Oxford American Dictionary

Rate this:

Word of the day: Clandestine

The word of the day, or more like word of the night(I’m terribly late today), is: Clandestine – adj. kept secret or done secretively, especially because illicit: she deserved better than these clandestine meeting. <ORIGIN>mid 16th cent.: from French clandestin or Latin clandestinus,  from ‘secretly’.   Source: The New Oxford American Dictionary

Rate this:

Word of the day: Arabesque

Hola! Today’s word is : Arabesque – an ornamental  design consisting of intertwined flowing lines, originally found in Arabic or Moorish decoration: (adj.)arabesque scroll. <SPECIAL USAGE> a passage or composition with fanciful ornamentation of the melody. Yuan Yuan Tan in arabesque position in Tomasson’s Nutcracker (copyright Erik Tomasson.Picture via sfgate.com. Image removed for copyright avoidance […]

Rate this: