Tag Archives: book review

Welcome to Night Vale by Joseph Fink and Jeffry Cranor

via Goodreads

Rated it: 3 stars

Read in: April

Note to people who’ve never listened to to podcast: I will not tell you that you can only enjoy this book if you listen to the episodes, though it would help.  From what I understand it’s marketed as a stand alone. Personally, I don’t mind if you disliked it. Only too easy to be confused and feel like an outsider. It’s a poor reflection of the podcast so please don’t let this discourage you from listening.

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When I say that I felt my mind bend several times throughout the book, I am not kidding. For some reason I still can’t put a finger on, I was skeptical about the entire thing. I could suppose that I was so trained to the podcast format that the setup for novel approach was … puzzling. Who am I kidding? Honestly it fell flat for me. There. I said it.

However, I am now satisfied in several respects with regards to the plots of certain episodes. For instance I can now file the away the speculation that The Man In The Tan Jacket is not actually Cecil’s long forgotten brother.

Thanks to The Man and his stupid note, Jackie’s become irritatingly aware of the oddness of her existence. Particularly pissed because because her boring routine life has been unashamedly demolished. The order and the peace of mind it brought, gone. It should be a damn crime.

Diane is more complicated. A single mother having to try communicate with an ever distant teenage shape-shifting son is nothing at all to sneeze at. Between that growing divide is the pothole of all potholes, his father Troy.

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A Clash of Kings (A Song of Ice and Fire #2) by George R.R. Martin

via Goodreads

Rated it: 4 stars

Finished on: May 4th

I’d read A Game of Thrones a few months before so it only took me a little while to get reacquainted with everyone and all that had happened. A Clash of Kings is a bloody good (spot the pun!) second book. The people, the places, the treason, it’s all so realistic and I can’t help but be emotionally invested.

Theon was somewhat of a surprise. I understand what drove him, what ate at him but he was impatient and too full of himself. I hate him for what he did to Winterfell and I so so hate him what he’s done to further split the Stark children apart. At the same time though, I felt sorry for the fool but that pride is a terrible thing.

The expedition beyond the wall was exciting to be sure. He hadn’t known what he was in for when he joined the Night’s Watch but it’s becoming clear to me it’s where Jon’s supposed to be. Who is he other than the bastard of Winterfell? The trials he’s to grapple with and battles he sure to face ahead will challenge and shape him and perhaps eventually he’ll begin to learn what sort of stuff he’s made of. I am itching to know what the wildlings are up to. When will we finally see this King Beyond The Wall?

Bran. I don’t know what to say. He’s the one in the most precarious situation, him and Rickon. Even cripples have to fight. I hope to god that Osha is as good as her word.

Tyrion Lannister is the black sheep of that lot, in more ways than one. He knows what Cerci and Jaime had been up to, he knows what those of his house are capable of. So so very unlike Ned Stark, he keeps what has been under wraps, biding time, and playing chess and still remain loyal to his house. While being Hand of the King he does what he can for the realm, not for himself.

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Filed under Books, Fantasy, Fiction

After Dark by Haruki Murakami

via Goodreads.com

Rated: 5/5 stars

Eyes mark the shape of the city.

– page 3, 11:56 PM

Have you ever felt that a certain book could have been written just for you? After Dark is mine. Possessive, I know, that’s how it feels but then since when has a book never been personal? It’s a quiet and observant work of art, one that just states it purpose in an understated inflection that belies its significance, its message to us.

This is my first Haruki Murakami and I have fallen in love. I’ve tried so much, struggled to express into words the soft-but-firm clinging strings of the spell that the night has cast upon me. So far, I haven’t found a short version, After Dark is the long one, and it’s come close.

Commuter trains of many colours move in all directions, transporting people from place to place. Each of those under transport is a human being with a different face and mind, and at the same time each is a nameless part of the collective entity. Each is simultaneously a part of a self-contained whole and a mere part. Handling this dualism of theirs skillfully and advantageously, they perform their morning rituals with deftness and precision: brushing teeth, shaving, tying neckties, applying lipstick.
– page 241, 6:50 AM

This fact of being an individual entity and a part of an ever morphing jigsaw puzzle of existence simultaneously, has always been on the fringes of my awareness and reading this it fills me with some contentment, now that I’ve finally seen it put in a coherent arrangement of words.

Mari has made her way through the long hours of darkness, traded many words with the night people she encountered there, and come back to where she belongs.
– page 243, 6:52 AM Continue reading

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Filed under Books, Fiction, Mad Reviewer Reading Challenge