Fear It: Book Slump | My foray into Stoicism

It’s official. I can’t read any more for or at least for the foreseeable future.

I don’t know if it’s because I’m forcing myself into non-fiction or that I’m restricting myself to fewer books at once as I’m wont to read at least four at any given time. Which would be counter-intuitive for the very reason I tried that in the first place: concentration.

But I’m inclined to believe it’s because how much I’m living inside my head lately. The saddest thing is that I’ve gotten used to the hole this has left in me, I’ve worn a path around it.

However, I decided to be optimistic or perhaps the word should be realistic. I’m too used to bemoaning things that I can actually change or learn from. Baby steps: a chapter a day of my current primary read “Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior” by Leonard Mlodinow.

Then once a day introspection from “The Daily Stoic: 366 Meditations on Wisdom …” which should be simple enough.

Stoicism

As I’m here I’ll get it out that I’m investing time into learning the Stoic teachings of the likes of Seneca The Younger, Epectitus and Marcus Aurelius. I’ve been listening to The Practical Stoic Podcast and signed up for The Daily Stoic newsletters and even joined their Facebook group.

It’s … enlightening. In fact, it’s possibly the most practical philosophy out there and it’s reflected in one of Aurelius’ quotes:

Waste No More Time Arguing What A Good Man Should Be. Be One.”

From my previous readings into the varieties of philosophy, I have noticed much debate about how people should live to the metaphysical probabilities of reality and a great many other interesting facets of thought. Stoicism encourages you to live every day in accordance with nature and to cultivate character to the best of your ability. Don’t just think about how to live, practice it.

To give a super brief overview, courtesy of The Daily Stoic:

The Philosophy asserts that virtue (such as wisdom) is happiness and judgment should be based on behavior rather than words.

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Les Brown: Set Your Mind To Win

Hello everyone, today I’d like to share with you a video of one of the most amazing men I’ve come to know via the internet, Mr. Les Brown. A motivational speaker many of you might be familiar with, if not here’s your chance for a better way of living. I am not exaggerating.

He, with the likes of the late Mr. Jim Rohn, has changed my outlook not merely on my life, but my abilities, who’ve made me realize I can challenge my limits, that with determination, logic, and patience I can be the me I’m supposed to be.

This video is one of his latest uploads, he’s now 72 and is living with cancer and a multitude of other problems that comes with it, as you will hear him speak about. I admire his attitude and fortitude with which he perseveres and that huge heart of his that continues to give, to inspire all of us.

Not to mention that laugh of his! I mean, have you heard the man laugh? A while ago I was down in the trenches, I was barely keeping a passable smile on my face. There was this beautiful video he burst so suddenly into laughter. It hit me in the heart and I couldn’t help it I had tears streaming down my face as I held my side because I was laughing so hard with him!

Les Brown is a Giver, and I’m most grateful to have received his wisdom and kindness. And I pray, for what good that may do, that he recovers fully and that hardship may never bring him to his knees. He’s strong, yes, but he’s human too.

There are lots more videos and I encourage you to check them out.

Keep your head up, folks. I believe in you.

Devina.

Directions …

Hey folks, check out my new academic themed blog!

A Dragon In Progress

I’ve had this blog on standby for a few months. Part of that’s because time constraints, part is indecision and part confidence or should I say a lack thereof.

Time, I battle distractions on a daily basis. Now, if I find something of interest you can bet I’d dedicate a solid few hours of research. The problem lies in my organizational skills, the development of which is one of the reasons why I began this site in the first place. So, work in progress.

Indecision, where do I begin? How in depth should I go? Perhaps I can touch briefly on a subject and at a later date expound on it … yes, that may work with my current frame of mind. And plus I’m simply beside myself, it’s so exciting to actually begin this project!

What subjects will I cover? Will it be exclusively language, and archaeology/anthropology? No, I’ve decided…

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Look who’s back: George Ezra’s newest album, Staying At Tamara’s

Five years. Five freaking years I’ve waited for this.

The past few days found me in a state of periodic temporary despair. I’m doing better today but what made it even better was George Ezra’s and Troye Sivan’s upcoming releases. If you follow George you’d have seen a teaser for the first featured song as well as his #AskGeorgeEzra session.

#AskGeorgeEzra on Twitter

Wanted on Voyage is a bloody work of art, you can fight me on this. I’ve listened to it about twenty times and I’ll do it again because it’s that good. Budapest was the first song of his I’ve heard, it was back when iTunes was promoting new artists by letting people download a new song each week, but I hope I’d have found him even if that weren’t the case. It was massive surprise the first time I saw him, I most certainly didn’t match that heavy voice with the guy.

Here’s a lyric video (unofficial) of his latest song, Paradise.

It’s lyrically straightforward, lighthearted and simply lovely. Vocally, rhythmically and beat-wise? It’s …

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Thoughts on John Green’s Labyrinth

Eyeball that bit of wisdom. Read it again. One more time to be sure. Okay then. Maybe you recognize some of that in yourself, I know I do.

An infernally astute quote from John’s debut novel, Looking for Alaska. “Infernal” because it illustrates a sort of personal hell I should be scrambling to escape. A loop whose deeply rutted trail I’m vaguely aware of at the best of times and crystal sharp at the worst of times.

Which is f**king tedious? I mean if I could be aware of all the tomorrows I tell myself I have and not take them for granted, I’ll get my goals accomplished, every day I would be compelled to complete them.

But like the blessed idiot that I am, I do stupid sh*t anyway. And I could analyze to kingdom come about the lies I convince myself are truths, their roots lay in self-doubt and lack of self-compassion. I’ve thought out of the whys and have finally sifted and understood what some of my actual truths are. Three years ago this introspection would’ve been beyond me but I feel lighter at the thought that I’ve come so far that I can see how I could fortify wobbly foundations and continue to build my person. Growth is always the goal.

But essentially the labyrinth is a fantastic illusion that could make us or dismantle us and perhaps it can only work out if we realize that within it we can make new paths. That we can take a chainsaw to some of the dead ends, and plant new saplings.

The past is a ghost. The future a phantom horizon. The present? It’s where we live. It’s not always pleasant but it’s where our hearts beat, the precipice of the next moment. Isn’t it awful how we conjure those ghosts and let them possess us? How we often try to dream out the possible futures thereby plugging up the goodness that the present can offer?

I read Looking for Alaska about two years ago, stayed up until morning to finish it only to have a feeling of mental suspension and an excellent view of the void. Alaska was a bitch, sure, but

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